Saturday, 17 August 2013

Camping Island at Hurley Lock

I had seen this camp site on my map but didn´t have a clue how to get there. First as I arrived at Hurley Lock there was a sign that one has to book and pay for the camp site at the lock keeper in Hurley. So I did that, paid 10 pounds and got the code for a padlock for the gate on the weir.
The camp site itself has a long story. During the Blitz in 1942 children were sent here to get out of London. The military tents they used are still there and for 1000 pound a year one can have one of those tents. The people staying there has been there for generations already. Mostly everybody who spent his childhood on the island keep on coming every summer.
Apart from that, there are 8 places for touring campers. I had luck to get one of the rare pitches.






















 A wedding party on the river, give the bride a wave :)



Hybrid ducki - Several years ago a rich man nearby the river let his geese free, and they mixed up with the ducks.



8 comments:

  1. That tent in the middle looks well fixed ... is it swedish?

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    1. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Tcv-OtzVTDU/SfqrlglwGTI/AAAAAAAABJg/DzSvtqtgjYk/s400/PippiLangstrumpf.jpg

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    2. Why not? ... Look at the colours

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    3. http://i1246.photobucket.com/albums/gg604/viti11/2013-08-23_00023_zpsb8a682a7.jpg

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    4. Hi guys my family actually own a pitch down there it is really good fun the 6th pic is actually my family's tent! We've had the pitch for about 50 years so if u have any questions just ask!! I recommend it to any who loves getting away from all the loudness of the roads and loves nature!

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  2. I wouldn't want to be the one who has to re-tension the guy ropes after rain!

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  3. In the mid 1960s, I had one of those tents. I used to visit friends on that island and when I heard of a tent becoming vacant, I jumped at the chance to buy and rent one. A bit unusual in those days for a young girl of 20 to camp on her own. The tent cost £40 and the Thames Conservancy (as it once was known) charged a whopping £18 per year! - those were the days!
    The setting was idyllic and safe, and the islanders were a great bunch of people. The tents were allowed to be pitched from April to September.
    What wasn't so great was the taking turns to empty the Elsanol loos. The oil drum-like loos which had removeable wooden seats, had to be physically carried to the sanitary area and emptied - no proper plumbing in those days! But it was a small price to pay, for it was great sleeping under canvass. The army ridge tents were a good size and had room for sprung single bed(s). It was good to wake up to the dewey morning freshness and the sound of quacking or ducks, or the warmth of the sun on the tent, if not getting up too early.

    I will always have fond memories of having walked back from the village pub in the evening, then to sit out under the awning with friends till the small hours drinking coffee with the black night lit only by stars and a Tilly lamp, whilst we chatted in low tones, (so as not to disturb other sleeping islanders), and the sounds of the river gushing over the weir in the distance, plus the hooting of the occasional owl. Remembering also the night fishing for eels...great memories.

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    1. Thanks Sandy! This was nice informations!

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